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Welcome to the online presence of KaBooM, a writing group that has sustained the creative lives of a diverse group of women for over a decade. We hope that getting to know us will inspire you, too!Welcome to the online presence of KaBooM, a writing group that has sustained the creative lives of a diverse group of women for over a decade. We hope that getting to know us will inspire you, too!

Welcome to the online presence of KaBooM, a writing group that has sustained the creative lives of a diverse group of women for over a decade. We hope that getting to know us will inspire you, too!


The KaBooM Writers Notebook: Our Blog

Inspired by The Crimson Tide

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Several weeks ago, I was watching a football game on TV. Although I appeared to be calmly lying on the couch under a blanket, my heart was pounding. The Alabama Crimson Tide‘s best running back had just fumbled the ball on the six yard line and LSU had recovered. There was a minute and fifteen seconds on the clock.

It appeared that Alabama’s quest for the SEC West title was doomed. All LSU had to do was score. WIth only six yards to cover in four downs, it would take a miracle for the Tide to win. At this moment the score was tied, 10-10. Alabama’s coach, Nick Saban, told the defense that if they held LSU to a field goal (3 points) that he was confident the (struggling) offense could score its own field goal.

Saban “spoke the word,” as Florence Scovel Shinn claims in her book The Game of Life And How to Play It, is the way to success. This book was on a list of recommended reading given out by Margaret Wrinkle, author of the astonishing novel Wash, at the Kentucky Women Writers Conference last fall. Shinn says that “Two attitudes of mind cause loss, depreciation, or fear of loss, which makes a picture of loss in the subconscious.” Clearly Saban was describing a win to his team, despite the outward appearance of impossibility: stopping a powerful team from scoring a touchdown and then seeing his own struggling offense go 50 yards in under a minute and score a field goal.

Yet, that is exactly what happened in the football game. LSU was pushed back away from the goal line and scored a field goal. Alabama got the ball back with 55 seconds to go and manage to move it into field goal range and score its own three points. Alabama then won the game in over-time. And will now have the chance to win a national championship.

What inspires me about this game is the fact that the Tide planned to win, even if it was at the last minute, when the appearance of facts: little time left, the opponent about to score, suggested a loss. It is a good lesson to consider as a writer. When rejections mount, the writer, who must believe in her game plan, her preparation, her work, continues to aim for the win. I am working with Shinn’s ideas that “your word is your wand” and that “Spirit is never late.” I am developing the confidence that although events may make a loss seem likely, that if you have faith and stand still in the face of opposition, that your best path will manifest.  Perhaps this faith that I will reach the goal is the most necessary element of success, after all the hard work, the desire, the revisions, the attempts at getting every word right.

And, just for fun, here’s a video of another Tide fan who was clearly inspired by the play of one Crimson Tide player, Amari Cooper.  

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